• Joshua Buchholtz

A Time for Prayer and Fasting

Our church just finished up a period of 21 days of fasting and prayer. We took this time to limit ourselves to one meal a day (OMAD) and use that time we would usually eat lunch on our breaks at work as a time to reflect and pray. We also limited our consumption of media daily and replaced it with music in the background and doing home projects to replace the time we would be on our phones or watching TV. I would love to say we were 100% successful in this, but there were a few days in the fast where we weren’t as accomplished as we would have liked to be. However, we made it a point to not be legalistic about this fast.

During that time we were asking God to heal our land, have our nation turn to repentance as well as ask for confirmation and direction in our own personal lives. To accompany this, our church also had 4 nights (each Friday of the fast) to worship and share testimony’s of what God was speaking to us during this time.

I cannot describe or begin to express how mighty the spirit of God was during those Friday nights. So much testimony, interpretation of tongues, powerful worship, and most of all a yearning to know God more.  If you are unfamiliar with the power of praying and fasting, I recommend reading about Daniel’s time of fasting (which is where you have probably heard the term the “Daniel Fast”) here.

Fasting, while it does have it’s added health benefits for those of us who practice intermittent fasting, when it is done with a spiritual focus; it has an overwhelming sense of just being in tune with God, to talk with Him, to know Him and most of all experience the love that He has for us.

When wanting to fast, it is important to examine, what the purpose of your fast is, what kind of fast you want to do, and what are you seeking God for in your fast?

I pray that you consider a period of praying (no pun intended) and fasting to grow your walk with God and to communicate with him on a daily basis.

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